4 Best Command to Clear Your Linux Terminal

linux clear terminal history
linux clear terminal history

The Linux terminal is an important tool for system administrators, developers, and other IT professionals. Knowing how to efficiently clear the terminal is essential for keeping your workflow organized and efficient.

In this article, we will discuss the commands to clear Linux terminal and provide useful examples of their use. We will look at the different ways of using these commands to clean up the terminal window and make it easier for you to work with. We will also discuss some best practices when it comes to cleaning up your terminal window.

linux clear terminal history, Commands

 1. Clear Linux Terminal Via clear Command

The clear command is a basic command in Linux that is used to clear the contents of the terminal screen. When you run the clear command, it will remove all the output that was previously displayed in the terminal and leave the cursor at the top-left corner of the screen.

Here’s an example of how to use the clear command in a Linux terminal:

  1. Open a terminal window.
  2. Type clear and press Enter.
  3. The screen will be cleared, and the cursor will be at the top-left corner of the screen.
  4. You can now enter new commands or run new programs in the terminal.

The clear command is a quick way to clean up the terminal screen if it gets cluttered with too many commands and output. It is a simple but essential command that every Linux user should know.

2. Clear Linux Terminal Via Ctrl+L Command

This is a keyboard shortcut that can be used to clear the terminal screen. It is a quick way to clear the screen without having to type any commands.

The ctrl+L shortcut can be used to clear the terminal window. However, this doesn’t delete the information that is stored in the scroll-back buffers which store data from past commands.

If you would like to demonstrate this, you can start by pressing ‘Ctrl + L‘ to clear the terminal screen, and then scroll up using your mouse.

The reset command in Linux is used to reset the terminal. When you run the reset command, it will restore the terminal to its default settings, clear the screen, and set the cursor position to the top-left corner of the screen. This is useful if you’ve made a lot of changes to the terminal settings or if the terminal is displaying strange characters.

Here’s an example of how to use the reset command in a Linux terminal:

  1. Open a terminal window.
  2. Type reset and press Enter.
  3. The terminal will be reset to its default settings, and the screen will be cleared.
  4. The cursor will be positioned at the top-left corner of the screen.
  5. You can now enter new commands or run new programs in the terminal.

The reset command is a powerful command that can be used to fix issues with the terminal or to simply start with a clean slate. However, be aware that it will reset all the settings you’ve configured in the terminal to their default values, so use it with caution.

4. Clear Linux Terminal Via tput reset Command

The tput reset command in Linux is another way to reset the terminal. It is similar to the reset command, but it uses the tput utility to send terminal control codes to reset the terminal.

Here’s an example of how to use the tput reset command in a Linux terminal:

  1. Open a terminal window.
  2. Type tput reset and press Enter.
  3. The terminal will be reset to its default settings, and the screen will be cleared.
  4. The cursor will be positioned at the top-left corner of the screen.
  5. You can now enter new commands or run new programs in the terminal.

The tput utility is a powerful tool that can be used to send terminal control codes to the terminal. It is often used in shell scripts to manipulate the terminal. The tput reset command is a convenient way to reset the terminal without having to remember the terminal control codes.

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